Ongava Research Centre Blog...


2016- Week 03
- (Added 17. Jan. 2016 - 11:00)

 And here is at least one of them caught in the act… Adolescent male!



2016- Week 02
- (Added 10. Jan. 2016 - 11:00)

I’m not showing you this image to see the snarl on the male lion’s face (although that is a nice example of the ‘flehman response’  - if you remember from early days of the blog, I talked about this response, and how males use that to direct air into their Jacobsen’s organ to assess the pheromones in female scent). Look at the background. There goes another camera trapping tree. Or trees. You can guess who the culprits are…



2016- Week 01
- (Added 3. Jan. 2015 - 11:00)

Hello everybody, and a Happy New Year to all...

Here’s a nice picture of a group of black-faced impala (Aepyceros melampus petersi) to start off the season. Note just one male... There is some debate as to whether the black-faced variety is a sub-species, with recent genetic evidence suggesting perhaps not. However, black-faced rams are in high demand, since they are significantly bigger the common impala – hence some more unscrupulous breeders will mix the back-faced line with common impala to produce larger specimens. On Ongava we have a pure line of black-faced impala, one of the largest privately held herds.



Xmas 2015
- (Added 20. Dec. 2015 - 11:00)

 Hello to all out there. We here at ORC would like to wish all our readers, colleagues and espeically our sponsors a great Xmas. See you all in the New Year!



2015 - Week 47
- (Added 22. Nov. 2015 - 11:00)

Difficult to say who is the ‘spikiest’ in this camera trap picture! Obviously the brown hyaena is not impressed with the porcupine being so close…




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